Good gay-friendly doctors in Toronto | Page 3

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by SP!RE, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. vvanderthirst

    vvanderthirst New Member

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    Which doc is tat :p
     
    #31

  2. freshcutgrass

    freshcutgrass Senior Member

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    Ah...so the problem does not seem to be doctors, as they are all gay friendly. The problem is that you are a heterophobic patient. :p
     
    #32
  3. torontologist

    torontologist Active Member

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    I can assure you that is not the case.

    In my experience, most doctors with a very different "lived experience" are not comfortable talking about LGBTQ health concerns. That, in addition to the risk of bias, is the reason many queer people are more comfortable with a queer doctor.
     
    #33
  4. freshcutgrass

    freshcutgrass Senior Member

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    First of all, what gave you the impression they were uncomfortable? It's possible you are just projecting, as they are the trained professionals and you aren't. It's like some people prefer a male or female doctor. Has less to do with the quality of service and more to do with your own level of comfort.

    Secondly, the kind of health related sexual questions you need to ask a GP have little, if nothing to do with your orientation. I could understand a gay-friendly shrink (as there are gay-specific mental health issue)s, but not a GP.
     
    #34
  5. nfitz

    nfitz Superstar

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    That's true of anything though ... my one doctor started the physical with the "how much do you drink" question, and my answer of "not enough" seemed to create surprising concern, and many more unnecessary questions (I was serious, I can go weeks without a drink, as it simply doesn't cross my mind. I'd probably be better for 2-3 drinks a week). I later learned he was some religion I'm not very familiar with that doesn't drink.
     
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  6. freshcutgrass

    freshcutgrass Senior Member

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    I doubt his concern has a thing to do with his religion, and everything to do with the red flag health concerns your "joke" brought up. You don't make those kind of jokes to your doctor for the same reason you don't make bomb jokes on a plane.
     
    #36
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  7. Skeezix

    Skeezix Senior Member

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    Those two things are not even remotely comparable. One depends on context, the other is a crime which could terrify others on the plane.
     
    #37
  8. freshcutgrass

    freshcutgrass Senior Member

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    They are both exactly the same in that those you are saying it to are occupationally obligated to err on the side of caution and take you seriously.
     
    #38
  9. Skeezix

    Skeezix Senior Member

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    Really? One being a crime that can both cause panic and will certainly land you in jail, and the other depending on the context causing mild concern/follow-up questions or a simple guffaw? The reaction to one will not be proportionately anything like the reaction to the other.

    You honestly think they're "exactly" the same? Okay. Thank God I am not your health care professional, and/or don't travel with you.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2017
    #39
  10. freshcutgrass

    freshcutgrass Senior Member

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    You are talking about the severity of the consequences of doing it, which may differ, while I'm talking about the reasoning behind why you shouldn't do it....which is the same. The point of my original post being that the doctor's response should not be surprising at all.
     
    #40
  11. Skeezix

    Skeezix Senior Member

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    But that's just it - the reasoning isn't even the same. The former you should not do it because jail/panic/distress/cause emergency landing/etc... The consequences are the reason. The other is just a joke - frankly unless one has a history of alcoholism, or your health care provider has zero sense of humour, I don't even think your "you shouldn't do it" admonition even applies to the latter. The fact that your health care provider might have to ask a follow-up question on actual consumption does not make it comparable in any way to saying "I have a bomb" on a plane, in terms of reasons or consequences.

    They are not even remotely the same thing. But if you want to keep defending your comparison, I leave you to it. I think I am done with this surreal discussion.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2017
    #41

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