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Thread: More Lost Toronto in colour

  1. #181

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    Quote Originally Posted by thecharioteer View Post
    Interesting to compare the site today and see traces of the driveway:



    remarkable.

    its a shame we lost a lot of those massive homes. another big teardown in Rosedale was the home of Sir Edmund Osler, Craigleigh, on South Drive where the only thing standing now are the gates.

    Osler bequeathed it to the city in 1924, and the city saw fit to tear it down in 1932. it was not as grand as Chorley, but was built quite a bit earlier, in 1876.



    there's a good photo contained in this PDF:

    http://www.southrosedale.org/newslet...03-2_-_May.pdf


  2. #182

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    Quote Originally Posted by thecharioteer View Post

    Chromolithograph of the City 1893 (TPL):
    Fascinating. This shows the Bathurst street bridge at a SW/NE angle instead of N/S as it is today, the pumping station at John street on the lakefront, and the baseball stadium on Queen at Broadview...

  3. #183

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    And a racetrack where the CNE is today.

  4. #184

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    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Black View Post
    And a racetrack where the CNE is today.
    And just north of that, the Mercer Reformatory with gardens out back

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
    And just north of that, the Mercer Reformatory with gardens out back
    Such a bucolic setting for such a grim institution:


  6. #186

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    At first I wondered if the map was translated from a series of photographs - some intrepid fella going up in a hot air balloon. Not necessarily, though, since such maps had already been produced for centuries.

  7. #187

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    One of those Birds Eye views of Toronto (from 1876) can be found on the U of T Data, Maps & GIS Centre website - the same one that appears on pages 78-79 of Hayes' Historical Atlas of Toronto.

    http://prod.library.utoronto.ca:8090...l/bev1876.html

    With the plug-in, and the .jp2 file, you can zoom in and see how detailed those 'maps' were.

    If only I could find great great grandpappy's house...

  8. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Urban Shocker View Post
    At first I wondered if the map was translated from a series of photographs - some intrepid fella going up in a hot air balloon. Not necessarily, though, since such maps had already been produced for centuries.

    The level of detail is quite extraordinary:


  9. #189

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    Yes, someone had fun doing that little lot!

    It's interesting to see the dense streetscapes, and the structures that once stood where the oases of green space we enjoy today - Berczy park and St. James park, in the section above, for instance - are now. It's as if, in their creation, we've reclaimed a little of our arboreal heritage ... though of course some nice old buildings were lost along the way.

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thecharioteer View Post
    ‘How could they have torn it down, one of the most beautiful buildings in the city? Jakob, are you sure we’re in the right place?’
    Premier Mitch Hepburn closed it down in the 1930s for two reasons. Firstly, it was during the Depression, and the place -- which was the Lt. Governor's home -- represented a huge annual outlay for the province, and cutting what was a sop to the idle rich during a time of suffering and poverty was an obvious vote-getter. Secondly, Hepburn had creeping republican sentiments and resented any overly overt display of British imperialism, and closing Chorley Park was his means to humble the Crown in Ontario. Whether or not this has anything to do with the fact that he was the last Liberal elected premier of this province until 1985 is open to interpretation.

    Interestingly, though, it was Nathan Phillips, no less, who actually tore it down, in the early 60s. You'd think it would have been Fred Gardiner...

  11. #191

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    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Black View Post
    And a racetrack where the CNE is today.
    Not quite: that was an earlier incarnation of the CNE Grandstand. Thus, said "racetrack" technically survived until recent times...

  12. #192

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    Quote Originally Posted by thecharioteer View Post
    The level of detail is quite extraordinary:

    Where's Waldo?

  13. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
    Fascinating. This shows the Bathurst street bridge at a SW/NE angle instead of N/S as it is today..
    Looking south on Bathurst from Niagara:


  14. #194

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    Neat picture.

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    From www.transit.toronto.on.ca some great pictures (behind the streetcars) of Toronto circa 1953-4:

    Yonge and Front:






    Front Street (Board of Trade Building at left, site of O'Keefe Centre to right):






    Front, in front of block demolished behind the Gooderham Building:


    Yonge south of Wellington:


    Church and Wellington:


    King and Church:


    Bay (hey, where's the Gardiner?):






    King:


    Wellington:


    College, west of Bay:


    Yonge, south of the Belt Line bridge:

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