Urban Toronto - Powered by vBulletin
UrbanToronto News - the latest headlines
CTBUH Hosts Tour Through Lanterra's Ice Condominiums
ALSO
Page 683 of 820 FirstFirst ... 183583633673681682683684685693733783 ... LastLast
Results 10,231 to 10,245 of 12297

Thread: Miscellany Toronto Photographs: Then and Now

  1. #10231

    Default

    Ah, I know the weekend is over and no more nonsense but I can't help my post Oscars excitement:

    Shirley Bassey. Then and Now.

    http://www.upi.com/blog/2013/02/24/W...spt=fsb&or=ros


  2. Default

    "Ah, I know the weekend is over and no more nonsense but I can't help my post Oscars excitement:
    Shirley Bassey. Then and Now:"
    QUOTE: Mustapha.

    http://www.upi.com/blog/2013/02/24/W...spt=fsb&or=ros

    And just to remind anyone who wants to "play" with Mr Auric Goldfinger:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwPxn...ture=endscreen

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...H0C6FNO5U&NR=1


    Regards,
    J T
    Last edited by J T CUNNINGHAM; 2013-Feb-25 at 03:42.
    IF only I had of questioned then, for the answers needed now . . .

  3. Default

    Birrell’s Bridge, Frank Barber, Township Engineer. Article by Frank Barber from “The Contract Record and Engineering Review,” May 14, 1914:








  4. #10234

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
    Economics.. eggs.. in one basket.. is a term that comes to mind. The automotive industry and its ancilliary and feeder industries raised Detroit to greatness. The industry's denouement/inevitable correction - Asia, robotics, race-to-the bottom market pressures; pick any or all and some I can't think of, means the Detroit situation is irreversible.
    We were there for the Auto Show at the end of January, and surprisingly the city *feels* better than it did when we were there last (ten years ago), at least in the downtown core. Several buildings have been saved and/or restored -- we stayed at the renovated Book-Cadillac (now a Westin) and were amazed to see one of the nearby abandoned skyscrapers had just reopened as condos/apartments. The gorgeous gorgeous Guardian Building is now fully restored and the lobby open to the public. There were people on the streets in a previously dead part of town. I get the feeling that people have now come to terms with what Detroit was and never will be again, but are eager to salvage some of that history and make it into something new, at least downtown. It's fitting that one of the big heroes of Detroit is the boxer Joe Louis--because Detroit feels like a champion boxer who's been hit many, many times and is sporting cuts and a black eye, but somehow gets up and keep fighting. Something about that city makes me root for it.

  5. Default

    The Oldest Known Photos of Toronto

    http://torontoist.com/2013/02/the-ol...os-of-toronto/

    King Street East, south side, looking west, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 1.


    At the left of this row of buildings is the Golden Lion, which rivalled Eaton’s and Simpson’s as one of Toronto’s major department stores during the late 19th century. Officially known as Robert Walker and Sons, the store earned its lasting name when a golden lion statue was placed above its entrance soon after it moved to the location shown here in 1847.

    Renovated in 1867 and expanded in 1892, the store appeared to have a healthy future. But when no one in the Walker family was left to carry on the business, it closed in 1898. Some observers had doubts about the site’s future when the store was demolished in 1901. “In Toronto they are pulling down the old Golden Lion to make room for a new White Elephant in the form of a palace,” wrote the Hamilton Herald.

    The replacement? The still-operating King Edward Hotel.





    King Street East, south side between Yonge and Church streets, looking east, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 2.


    Among the businesses seen in this view is the British Colonist, one of Toronto’s first enduring newspapers. Launched in 1838, it was originally backed by supporters of the Church of Scotland. Considered “a staunch but not rabid Conservative paper” by the book Early Toronto Newspapers 1793-1867, it graduated from semi-weekly to daily publishing in 1851. The paper was sold to rival Conservative paper the Leader in 1860.





    Bank of British North America, north-east corner of Wellington and Yonge streets, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 3.


    Opened in 1846, the limestone Bank of British North America was designed by John Howard, whose personal property later became High Park. Howard also designed the adjoining warehouses, which were initially occupied by a grocer. The building was rebuilt into its present form in the mid-1870s. The site housed branches of the Bank of Montreal and CIBC, then a variety of tenants before the Irish Embassy pub settled in.





    The Exchange, Wellington Street, north side, east of Yonge Street, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 4.


    Modelled on a similar exchange across the Atlantic in London, the Toronto Exchange was established in 1854 for speculation traders specializing in produce. One-time Toronto postmaster Charles Berczy donated land he owned at the present-day northwest corner of Wellington Street and Leader Lane to the organization. Opened in 1855, it was renovated in 1877 and renamed the Imperial Bank Chambers when that financial institution moved in. Damaged by fire during the 1930s, it was demolished during World War II.





    Second United Presbyterian Church under construction, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 7.


    Established in 1851, the Second United Presbyterian congregation renamed itself Cooke’s Presbyterian Church in 1856, in honour of Irish minister Henry Cooke. After holding services at several downtown locations, including St. Lawrence Hall, the congregation moved into its permanent home at Queen and Mutual streets in 1858. A Romanesque-style replacement was built in 1891 and became one of the city’s most popular churches. During the 1920s, woshippers had to get there early to grab one of its 2,250 seats. When the church closed in 1982, its congregation had dwindled to 150. Despite a last-minute heritage designation, the church was demolished in 1984. Though there were hints of future office/residential development, the site, which sits across from Torontoist’s office, became a parking lot.





    Normal School building, Gould Street, north side, east of Yonge Street, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 8.


    Founded in 1850 by Egerton Ryerson, the Normal School served as training institution for teachers, who would populate the province’s emerging public school system. Its home in St. James Square opened in 1852 and expanded a few years later to include the Model School, where boys’ grammar classes were held. Among its amenities was a museum of natural history and fine arts which evolved into the Royal Ontario Museum.

    The Normal School was moved out in 1941 to make room for an RCAF training centre. After World War II, the site was used to prepare veterans to return to civilian life, via a school that evolved into Ryerson University. The building was demolished to make way for the present Ryerson quadrangle in 1962. Only a portion of the central façade remains today.





    Osgoode Hall, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 9
    .

    Built between 1829 and 1846, Osgoode Hall served as the headquarters of the Law Society of Upper Canada. Shortly after this picture was taken, the central section was reconstructed by the architectural firm of Cumberland and Storm.





    Parliament Buildings, Front Street West, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 10.


    This was the third set of parliament buildings erected in Toronto. Three separate blocks were built on the north side of Front Street, between John and Simcoe streets, from 1829 to 1832. Architect John Howard was brought in to finish off the interiors. The complex was used intermittently during the United Province of Canada era (1841 to 1867), when legislators also sat in Kingston, Montreal, and Quebec City. When this picture was taken, work had begun to fill in the spaces between the blocks for offices, in case Toronto became the permanent capital. Post-Confederation, the buildings served as the home of Ontario’s government until the present Ontario Legislative Building in Queen’s Park opened in 1893. The Grand Trunk Railway purchased the site and demolished the buildings a decade later. The site currently houses the Canadian Broadcast Centre.





    Trinity College, Queen Street West, north side, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 11.


    When the University of Toronto declared itself a secular institution in 1850, Bishop John Strachan felt an institute of higher learning with ties to the Church of England was still required. He established Trinity College and hired architect Kivas Tully to design a Gothic-styled school, the first section of which opened in 1852.

    Trinity joined U of T in 1904 and moved to the main campus in 1925. The buildings it left behind in what became Trinity Bellwoods Park were briefly used as an athletic centre, then demolished in the mid-1950s. The only remaining portions are part of the gate at the park’s entrance and the former St. Hilda’s College building on Shaw Street, now John Gibson House.





    Rossin House Hotel, southeast corner of King and York streets, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 12.


    Introduction to an article on the opening of the Rossin House, the Globe, May 5, 1857:

    “The want of proper hotel accommodation has long been a standing reproach to Toronto, and the boasted enterprise and energy of our citizens has often been called into question by visitors from other places. No longer, however, will this be needed, for by the completion of the Rossin House, ample accommodation can be afforded for as large a number of guests as are likely to visit the city at any one time, and, as far as the house is concerned, satisfaction will be given to the most fastidious.”





    Toronto from the top of Rossin House Hotel, looking northwest, 1856.
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 14.


    This image formed part of one of three panoramas of the city, shot from the top of the Rossin House, which were meant to impress Queen Victoria with how much Toronto had grown.

    As for the Rossin House, though a fire in November 1862 gutted its interior, fire safety measures included by architect William Kauffman left the walls intact. There was only one fatality. Rebuilt by 1867, it remained one of Toronto’s most fashionable hotels until the King Edward opened in 1903. Later known as the Prince George Hotel, the building was demolished in 1969.

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M II A II R II K View Post
    The Oldest Known Photos of Toronto

    http://torontoist.com/2013/02/the-ol...os-of-toronto/



    Great overview! There's an error though in the section on the date of the destruction of the Exchange building; it was destroyed by fire in 1941:




  7. #10237

    Default

    As a young lad my mother would take me to Sherway Gardens for lunch at the restaurant inside Eaton's on the second floor. We would always get there by taking Sherway drive east from Dixie road to cross the old concrete arch bridge into Etobicoke and onto Evans avenue. As far as I know, it was the first such installation in Ontario, maybe Canada. Long since closed, it still remains over the Etobicoke creek and I understand it was restored a few years back. Story here: http://preservedstories.com/2012/12/...facebook-page/
    Quote Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
    Then and Now for February 25, 2013.





    Then. Bridge. Mill Street.







    Now. August 2012.




  8. #10238

    Default

    M II A II R II K, very interesting link to Torontoist. I mean, it's no mystery.. [Torontoist] and a nice reminder of how prolific a writer Jamie Bradburn is.

  9. #10239

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FAC33 View Post
    We were there for the Auto Show at the end of January, and surprisingly the city *feels* better than it did when we were there last (ten years ago), at least in the downtown core. Several buildings have been saved and/or restored -- we stayed at the renovated Book-Cadillac (now a Westin) and were amazed to see one of the nearby abandoned skyscrapers had just reopened as condos/apartments. The gorgeous gorgeous Guardian Building is now fully restored and the lobby open to the public. There were people on the streets in a previously dead part of town. I get the feeling that people have now come to terms with what Detroit was and never will be again, but are eager to salvage some of that history and make it into something new, at least downtown. It's fitting that one of the big heroes of Detroit is the boxer Joe Louis--because Detroit feels like a champion boxer who's been hit many, many times and is sporting cuts and a black eye, but somehow gets up and keep fighting. Something about that city makes me root for it.
    Nice to hear about the Book Cadillac, FAC33. Pre-renovation pictures - many of which inhabit the internet - were pretty frightening.

  10. #10240

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M II A II R II K View Post


    Can anyone identify the purpose of the elaborately rigged and stayed flagpole affair on the roof of the Exchange's neighbour?

  11. #10241

    Default

    Then and Now for February 26, 2013.



    Then. 'Jan. 15, 1947. Lawrence Ave. about 150' west of Yonge looking west.'





    Now. August 2012. All of these houses except the immediate one on the right in the Then picture still exist (it was taken down in the late 60s for a busway which still serves Lawrence subway station.


  12. #10242

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J T CUNNINGHAM View Post
    "Can anyone identify the purpose of the elaborately rigged and stayed flagpole affair on the roof of the Exchange's neighbour? "
    QUOTE: Mustapha.

    Boyd & Arthurs, Ship Chandlers.




    Regards,
    J T

    Ah, so it's not a flagpole... it's a 'mast.' Thank you JT.
    Last edited by Mustapha; 2013-Feb-26 at 21:08.

  13. #10243

    Default

    Then and Now for February 27, 2013.




    Then. 'Jan. 15, 1947. Lawrence Ave. about 150' west of Yonge looking EAST.' Some interesting old street lights here. Night time must have been a lot darker in Toronto in those days; even supposing if something like a 120 watt incandescent bulb was used. Borin' you yet?

    As boy I remember that old bank branch on the left... I grew up a few blocks to the south.






    Now. August 2012.

    The houses in the left distance - fourplexes - still exist, obscured by trees in the Now view. There are about 8 of these houses in a row. Probably all owned by one owner as all are maintained to the same 1940s look and high standard with sympathetic paintwork and original - I think - windows. Easy on the eyes they are; a row of guardians of a sort of staunch or respectable propriety that we might imagine North Toronto citizens of a time past may have thought of themselves.

    The George Locke library is in the right distance. Built in 1949, it occupies a kind of midpoint in a timeline of library construction in Toronto. Faced in stone but with airy windows it seems to me to be a unique 'one off' - between the early styles such as Roncesvalles or Beaches branch and later branches such as Forest Hill. My children studied and borrowed from Locke branch. In pre-internet days libraries were such busy places.


  14. #10244
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    The northern border of Pickering-Ajax
    Posts
    10

    Default Remembering Cullen Country Barns...

    I remember these barns. It was sad to see them go and I read that the wood used to build them had been collected from 5 old Ontario barns.

    The barns had many interesting things to see and purchase and we took many enjoyable walks through all the sections, then stopped at one of the little stores for a snack or an ice cream from the 'ice-cream parlour' in the summer.
    You could have an interesting meal at their restaurant and browse the country items for sale while awaiting your meal. a sit down meal.

    Christmas at 'The Barns' was a wonderful array of differently lighted and decorated trees and masses of unusual decorations for sale.

    It reminded us of a 'Winter Wonderland'.

    We also used to like to visit and browse the cluster of 'country stores' to the east of these huge barns.
    The decor was very 'country' complete with 'olde tyme' signs over each merchandise stall - yet all the faces of the vendors looking out at us were Chinese...

    It seemed such a loss that 'The Barns' were demolished and replaced by a modern glass and steel building, but I must admit the Pacific Mall attracts much more business than the barns ever did...and profit is the name of the game...

  15. #10245

    Default

    Four years ago I noted that the Concourse Building was still standing.
    It's dear to my heart because I had a summer job there over 60 years ago.
    Today I learned that the tenants are gone and the old building will be rebuilt as shown.




Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •