Urban Toronto - Powered by vBulletin
UrbanToronto News - the latest headlines
Throwback Thursday: Shuter and Church
ALSO
Page 445 of 797 FirstFirst ... 345395435443444445446447455495545 ... LastLast
Results 6,661 to 6,675 of 11949

Thread: Miscellany Toronto Photographs: Then and Now

  1. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HamiltonTransitHistory View Post
    A little earlier, because the trolley bus that replaced the Rogers Rd streetcar started running on July 21, 1974.

    Since this is a summer photo, and I don't think they've strung the additional wires for trolley buses, the latest this photo could be is the summer of 1973.
    Actually, given a closer look, the feeder tap insulating crossbar for the trolley bus wire hangers ( and wire ) is visible to the upper right adjacent to the streetcar wire, so it is likely 1974-perhaps even July 20th-the last day of streetcar service on Rogers road.


  2. #6662

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brewster View Post
    ... make it home without losing anybody.
    One of my memories is wandering around the CNE at the age of 10 with my friends. No parents.

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HamiltonTransitHistory View Post
    A little earlier, because the trolley bus that replaced the Rogers Rd streetcar started running on July 21, 1974.

    Since this is a summer photo, and I don't think they've strung the additional wires for trolley buses, the latest this photo could be is the summer of 1973.
    By the way, I'm not sure how to include the photo with my reply, so I will simply say that it is on page 411.

  4. #6664

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
    One of my memories is wandering around the CNE at the age of 10 with my friends. No parents.
    And the fear of losing someone meant having plans in place - like a meetup area. Now, when someone is lost, the cell phones get whipped out.
    Last edited by Mustapha; 2011-Sep-25 at 21:14. Reason: Responded to my own post, that's rich, eh? :)

  5. #6665

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by del View Post
    By the way, I'm not sure how to include the photo with my reply, so I will simply say that it is on page 411.
    Transit historians quest for precision never fails but to impress me. Considering how well we were/are served by the various modes of public transport - is there a system anywhere that didn't, at the end of the day, strive to keep to schedule and serve their ridership - deserve anything less in terms of public memory.

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BeeRich View Post
    Hi there. I just had a look on Environment Canada's site. This is what I found.

    Daily Temperatures for July 1936

    Graphed

    Third of three days up to 40.6C. Up from mid 20's (where I like it). Ya it peaked for 3 days, then went back down. 40.6C = 105F. And that is measured temperature. Then add humidity upon that. I would say it might have approached 50C with humidity. I've been in a kayak around 48C with humidity and it's not good.

    HTH
    That's the all time highest temperature ever recorded in the city of Toronto!

  7. #6667

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by del View Post
    Which is also the hottest all time temperature EVER recorded in the city of Toronto.
    del, we know you're new here, but that's enough, knock it off.

    kidding, just kidding.

  8. #6668

    Default

    Then and Now for Sep 26. Almost October. Where. Does. The. Time. Go?


    Then. Spadina and Grange NW corner c1914. 'Cooper Cap Building'. How fascinating that such an enterprise could exist in 1914 Toronto in such an imposing building. A Google search for Cooper Cap turns up nothing. Can anyone help? It would be nice to know something of the company...




    Now. May 2011. Still somewhat dowager like even with the most execrable windows and the cornices hacked away.


  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by del View Post
    That's the all time highest temperature ever recorded in the city of Toronto!
    Ya that SWO day, although I was up Parry Sound ways, was just plain stupid. We couldn't get cool, even in the shade. And I'm quite cool to begin with. <snicker>

  10. Default

    Went for a walk down Eglinton in the Leaside area while my better half did the Homesense and Marshall's marathon.

    LOOKING EAST FROM LAIRD ON EGLINGTON 2 by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    LOOKING NORTH WEST LAIRD AND EGLINTON by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    South west corner Laird and Eglinton by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    Sutherland and eglinton looking east by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    LAIRD AND EGLINTON SOUTH WEST by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    LAIRD AND EGLINTON LOOKING WEST by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    LOOKING EAST FROM LAIRD ON EGLINGTON by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    IBM EGLINTON AND DON MILLS by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    BRENTCLIFF AND EGLINTON 2 by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    BRENTCLIFF AND EGLINTON by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    856 EGLINTON EAST by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    892 EGLINTON EAST by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    888 EGLINTON EAST by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    HANNA AND EGLINTON LOOKING EAST by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    GLEN AVON 1 by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    DON AVON AND EGLINTON by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    EGLINTON AND DONLEA by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    800 EGLINTON EAST by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    CNIB ON BAYVIEW by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    896 EGLINTON EAST by Mr T.O., on Flickr

  11. #6671

    Default

    That last pair: more for the "I H8 EIFS" crowd.

  12. #6672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by adma View Post
    That last pair: more for the "I H8 EIFS" crowd.
    I think I might have that made into a shirt.

  13. #6673

    Default

    QUOTE=Mustapha;559587]Can you tell us anything about Robert McMann, AlbertHWagstaff?[/QUOTE]

    Ok, here’s what I know about Robert (Bob) McMann. I never met Mr. McMann personally but I did see him a couple of times in the morning standing at the corner of King and Queen East when I was on the way to work in the early 1990s, without knowing who he was. He was known in the local transit enthusiast circles from the 1960s to the 1980s, and I think for a time was the editor of the Upper Canada Railway Society Newsletter in the early 1970s. His photography trademark was walking a portion of a route and taking photos along the way in the favourable sun direction, say starting at Danforth & Coxwell in the AM rush hour and walking west to Broadview. In the afternoon on the same day he might have then gone from Bloor & Sherbourne west to Spadina or started at Bloor and Keele and walked to Jane. He covered all the main streetcar routes that were in operation before the Bloor-Danforth Subway opened, especially the ones that were going to be abandoned. He also took slides of the subway and trolley buses, so he covered the other electric modes, and even a few diesel buses, but streetcars were his main subject. He covered all the major transit events between the opening of the University Subway and the opening of the Harbourfront LRT line, getting opening day shots, last day shots, charters and special events. He continued doing the route photos right up into the late 1980s, but by the early 1990s he started sticking to photo spots where there was frequent service and wide open skies, like the intersection of King & Queen East, Broadview Ave (Broadview & Bain was one of his favourite spots), and Harbourfront. From what I was told by someone who knew him he suffered from the onset of dementia or another mental illness and didn’t take any more photos after the summer of 1993 and he passed away a few years later. I don’t know how old he was when he passed, but he wasn’t very old, probably in his 50s.

    He was known for buying the latest Nikon camera that came out every year, and he always used a motor-drive so that he would shoot several slides of every shot, which turned out to be a bonus for those who collect slides, as there are multiple originals of the same view, although some of his contemporaries couldn’t understand why he shot so many extras (they were also good for slide swaps), and he date-stamped and labeled EVERY ONE OF THEM. It’s a rare McMann slide that doesn’t have the date and location on it, although very few have his name on them, only those he traded away were stamped. Apparently he had more than 100 Nikon camera bodies in his apartment when he passed away and his thoroughness in shooting the streets was evidenced by someone who told me that he once put on a slide show of images along the Queen route with a shot of a streetcar at EVERY stop going west between Neville Park and Roncesvalles. Many of his early slides weren’t the greatest, either because he used cheap (ie. non-Kodachrome) slide film or because he hadn’t sharpened his photography skills yet, but once he got the hang of it and faster Kodachrome slide film became standard (64 ISO) he got to be quite good as seen by some of his views that have turned up on this thread.

    His collection was acquired by another transit enthusiast after he passed away and was sold in lots to a number of other enthusiasts. I was fortunate to be able to get a good collection of TTC slides from 1963 onwards and I continued his method of shooting slides while walking a portion of a route and even trying to recreate some of his shots, although he had it much easier since the street traffic in Toronto wasn’t nearly as busy decades ago and the streetcar service was much more frequent. Where he might have been able to shoot 20 streetcars in a half hour, now one is lucky to get 10 between the reduced service and heavy traffic making “clean” shots more difficult. Through his streetcar slides, he documented a lot of changes in the city, especially downtown as buildings were demolished and new ones went up although he didn’t seem to go out of his way often to specifically take views with buildings about to be demolished, more that he was just documenting the streetcars and happened to get the changing scenery of the city. Because of the known dates of transit changes and how well some were documented, the transit enthusiasts on the board can usually use the transit artifacts in a photo to narrow down dates of other activity in a photo quite well (as we’ve already seen!). Scanning my collection of McMann and his contemporaries is definitely a long-term project though.
    Last edited by AlbertHWagstaff; 2011-Sep-26 at 10:26.

  14. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
    Then and Now for Sep 26. Almost October. Where. Does. The. Time. Go?


    Then. Spadina and Grange NW corner c1914. 'Cooper Cap Building'. How fascinating that such an enterprise could exist in 1914 Toronto in such an imposing building. A Google search for Cooper Cap turns up nothing. Can anyone help? It would be nice to know something of the company...




    Now. May 2011. Still somewhat dowager like even with the most execrable windows and the cornices hacked away.

    Here are some pics of the building in context:




  15. #6675

    Default

    brewster's picture of Brentcliffe and Eglinton... Schlumberger's plant, as well as Canada Wire and Cable to the south, pretty well define Leaside's mid 20th century industrial makeup...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •