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Thread: Transit Fantasy Maps

  1. #3691

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    Quote Originally Posted by gweed123 View Post
    Nice map! So much simpler to read when it's only 90 and 45 degree angles, isn't it? The one suggestion I would make is putting route numbers/letters at the terminus points of each line. Especially with lines like the Red Line, it's somewhat difficult to figure out what branch ends up where (ex: does the Richmond Hill line end up at Dupont or at Gladstone?).
    I thought each line should be a different colour. One branch of the red line should be blue and another branch a yet to be used colour (gold). Where they are together, it is both colours.


  2. #3692

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    Thanks, dude. Since I posted I’ve made dozens of changes...but for the most part they were all aesthetics. After reading your post I took a gander at how other cities present their maps, and it would definitely make sense to display where sections of a particular line terminate/originate – and maybe even the type of service offered. I might go for the NYC technique. Which like you mention uses numbers and letters, but a whole whack of symbol combinations. So any next map may look a bit messy, but at the same time should be a lot clearer.

  3. #3693
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    Quote Originally Posted by CDL.TO View Post
    A one-stop extension of the BD line to East Mall/427 could be combined with dedicated on/off ramps to/from the 427 directly into the station's bus terminal. Even with just just ramps to/from the north, we would see CONSIDERABLE time savings for the 191, 192, and a whole bunch of Mississauga Transit routes (including the busway route).

    I wouldn't be surprised if building this would save 10 minutes on each bus trip using the 427 in the peak periods.
    I would like to see this happen and then a streetcar extension to Islington station. Maybe Extend the 505 Dundas and the 512 St Clair past with a new Runneymede Loop.

  4. #3694
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    Quote Originally Posted by 44 North View Post
    __
    Here’s my attempt at a simplified schematic map, with some added fantasy. Like the Tube map, I only used 90 and 45 degree angles. This wasn’t as tricky as I thought, considering Toronto is fairly grid-like and follows the concession system. Although it looks more top-heavy than I’d like, the level of distortion is quite minimal. I decided to share it before I started tinkering/tweaking it to death, or making it too busy by adding highways and geographical features.
    I love this map. Only quibble is you have to do something on Finch or Sheppard.

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by denfromoakvillemilton View Post
    I would like to see this happen and then a streetcar extension to Islington station. Maybe Extend the 505 Dundas and the 512 St Clair past with a new Runneymede Loop.
    I've heard of dormant TTC plans for an extension of the St. Clair streetcar along Dundas West (west of Scarlett Road) to Kipling station, but haven't heard of an Islington station streetcar. Although apparently the extension plan is dead (in comments) because the reconfiguration of the Scarlett Road underpass didn't allow for it.

  6. #3696
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    Quote Originally Posted by 44 North View Post
    Thanks, dude. Since I posted I’ve made dozens of changes...but for the most part they were all aesthetics. After reading your post I took a gander at how other cities present their maps, and it would definitely make sense to display where sections of a particular line terminate/originate – and maybe even the type of service offered. I might go for the NYC technique. Which like you mention uses numbers and letters, but a whole whack of symbol combinations. So any next map may look a bit messy, but at the same time should be a lot clearer.
    Yup, the NYC map is a good starting point. I've adopted most of the INAT standard for my maps, because I think it's a really easy to read style. Here's the INAT map of the NYC Subway: http://www.inat.fr/metro/new-york/. The London one is pretty amazing too: http://www.inat.fr/metro/london/. He places the route identifiers just at terminus points, so that you can easily trace a route through the system. For Toronto right now it isn't an issue because there isn't any interlining or anything, but with your proposal there would be.

    In terms of the type of service offered, I've always gone with a letter prefix describing the service type followed by a route number. I think it's the easiest way of immediately identifying what type of service you're working with, but again that's just my personal preference. There are certainly other ways of doing it (different shapes on the identifiers, letters vs numbers, different line weights and patterns, etc).
    Twitter: @JAndrewJ86

  7. #3697
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    Quote Originally Posted by aquateam View Post
    I've heard of dormant TTC plans for an extension of the St. Clair streetcar along Dundas West (west of Scarlett Road) to Kipling station, but haven't heard of an Islington station streetcar. Although apparently the extension plan is dead (in comments) because the reconfiguration of the Scarlett Road underpass didn't allow for it.
    That sucks. They should try to do something with the underpass because it would relieve at least a small part of the subway.

  8. Default

    ...I was bored and made a completely ridiculous Peel rapid transit fantasy map. It's here. I see about half this map was realistic and the other half as just a massive wishlist.

  9. Default

    Quick question, would GO RER and Smartrack be considered a "metro" type of rapid transit. If so, when this is fully implemented, the GTA would have one of the most extensive metro systems in the world.

  10. #3700

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    Quote Originally Posted by civdis View Post
    Quick question, would GO RER and Smartrack be considered a "metro" type of rapid transit. If so, when this is fully implemented, the GTA would have one of the most extensive metro systems in the world.
    Probably not. Not unless you consider the aboveground suburban/regional rail systems in pretty much every city in Europe and much of Asia to also be "Metro"?

    I'm sure many will try and argue that it is a "metro" however. We're not going to escape from the false idea that anything which isn't a metro/subway is inherently inferior any time soon.
    Last edited by CDL.TO; 2014-Nov-19 at 15:20.

  11. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by civdis View Post
    Quick question, would GO RER and Smartrack be considered a "metro" type of rapid transit. If so, when this is fully implemented, the GTA would have one of the most extensive metro systems in the world.
    If they hit that 15 minutes or better frequencies, GO RER would be on par with the Washington DC Subway system which most here consider to be a metro.

  12. #3702
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    Quote Originally Posted by civdis View Post
    Quick question, would GO RER and Smartrack be considered a "metro" type of rapid transit. If so, when this is fully implemented, the GTA would have one of the most extensive metro systems in the world.
    That's the whole idea of SmartTrack, and one of the differences from regularly flavoured GO RER.

    It's on the subway map. That's the way it was presented, as part of the TTC rapid transit system, on the subway map.

    Being on the map implies certain things:
    1. Part of the TTC system, covered by TTC fare with free transfers to other TTC routes, just like another subway line
    2. Service level approaching TTC rapid transit standards. 15 min is the minimum frequency, they will likely need more frequent on peak
    3. Stop spacing being more dense than typical GO or regional systems. We see this on the SmartTrack map, it's wider spacing than typical subway in Toronto, but way more stops than a GO/commuter/regional system

    My impression is that the whole idea of it is to approach rapid transit on GO from a local, TTC, subway-like perspective, and the service levels and price that that implies, and the idea was presented that way.

  13. #3703

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    So here’s an update to my previous map - with letters and symbols identifying each line and its branches. As well I added a waterfront RT line.

    The numbers and symbols are fairly self-explanatory. This city has twelve lines, four of which are split into lettered branches (the Yellow, Blue, Red, and Orange lines). Squares identify a line’s terminus, circles are any point between termini, and diamonds are some kind of express or bypass. Every station is treated like a local service where all trains stop.

    The waterfront line I’ve been thinking about for awhile now. I was a bit reluctant to add it because IMO it somewhat throws off the balance of the map. And I haven’t really examined the routing all that much. But I’d like it to be an actual RT line (perhaps using streetcars) - instead of an in-median streetcar stopping at every traffic light. Theoretically it would run anywhere along the backs of properties, adjacent to the Gardiner and Lake Shore, and trenched/elevated where need be. Instead of diverting into Union like the Queens Quay streetcar (and planned QQ East line) this line would bypass Union altogether. We’re about to spend +$300M to expand the streetcar tunnel below Union, which IMO is a ridiculous amount of money for something that isn't rapid transit. And it negates the possibility one cross-waterfront line by rendering it as two disjointed pieces. The connection at Cherry is another major expenditure (~$50M) for what amounts to slow local service transit.

    I like to think of it more as London’s Docklands Light Railway than a touristy monorail. And if this line is connected to transit hubs at either end, it wouldn’t need to be so Union-centric and could actually provide fast service to the tens of thousands in a catchment from the lake to King. I’d like to see streetcars expanded into the suburbs, or even inner suburbs like East York, York, and south Scarborough or Etobicoke. But the core of Toronto is somewhat outgrowing the merits of an in-median setup.

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    Last edited by 44 North; 2014-Nov-19 at 22:53.

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