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Thread: Queen Street West: Then and Now

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    I was wondering... are there any photographs of Queen and Dufferin when it was still a level crossing?


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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Primate View Post
    I was wondering... are there any photographs of Queen and Dufferin when it was still a level crossing?
    Not sure Lone. These 2 from 1897-1898 look like they may have just been building the underpass.Looking south from Queen.

    s0376_fl0002_it0010 by Mr T.O., on Flickr


    s0376_fl0002_it0004 by Mr T.O., on Flickr

  3. #33

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    Keep in mind that the 1897-98 construction was a rebuild and widening of an earlier underpass/"subway" on Queen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tewder View Post
    Interesting to note the water tower. Are there any still around in the city?
    They're quite rare now with only a handful coming to mind. There used to be many downtown, judging by historical photos. There's one at 224 Wallace Avenue at a converted factory from 1922. Now closed, the Korex factory has one on site. The Christie bakery also has one. However, the last two look more modern than the one on Wallace. I think we should preserve such interesting aspects of industrial history. With the recent demolition of an old brick smokestack on the GE Canada Davenport site without much controversy, I fear that old industrial smokestacks will also soon be demolished and forgotten even though they're interesting historical markers that can enliven an area with a greater sense of its own history.
    Last edited by junctionist; 2012-Jan-06 at 22:33.

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    Quote Originally Posted by adma View Post
    Keep in mind that the 1897-98 construction was a rebuild and widening of an earlier underpass/"subway" on Queen.
    You are probably right adma , I usually post photo's without any knowledge just for the sake of looking at them. I should put a little more effort and research behind them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by junctionist View Post
    They're quite rare now with only a handful coming to mind. There used to be many downtown, judging by historical photos. There's one at 224 Wallace Avenue at a converted factory from 1922. Now closed, the Korex factory has one on site. The Christie bakery also has one. However, the last two look more modern than the one on Wallace. I think we should preserve such interesting aspects of industrial history. With the recent demolition of an old brick smokestack on the GE Canada Davenport site without much controversy, I fear that old industrial smokestacks will also soon be demolished and forgotten even though they're interesting historical markers that can enliven an area with a greater sense of its own history.
    What was the original purpose of the water tower's? Was there no centralized plumbing in the city? Why do we have huge water tower's scattered around the city? Why do I have to know everything?

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by brewster View Post
    What was the original purpose of the water tower's? Was there no centralized plumbing in the city? Why do we have huge water tower's scattered around the city? Why do I have to know everything?
    One reason, I believe, was to supply emergency water pressure to a sprinkler system until the fire department arrived.

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    Quote Originally Posted by junctionist View Post
    They're quite rare now with only a handful coming to mind. There used to be many downtown, judging by historical photos. There's one at 224 Wallace Avenue at a converted factory from 1922. Now closed, the Korex factory has one on site. The Christie bakery also has one. However, the last two look more modern than the one on Wallace. I think we should preserve such interesting aspects of industrial history. With the recent demolition of an old brick smokestack on the GE Canada Davenport site without much controversy, I fear that old industrial smokestacks will also soon be demolished and forgotten even though they're interesting historical markers that can enliven an area with a greater sense of its own history.
    A couple of newer ones up in Rexdale.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by junctionist View Post
    They're quite rare now with only a handful coming to mind. There used to be many downtown, judging by historical photos. There's one at 224 Wallace Avenue at a converted factory from 1922. Now closed, the Korex factory has one on site. The Christie bakery also has one. However, the last two look more modern than the one on Wallace. I think we should preserve such interesting aspects of industrial history. With the recent demolition of an old brick smokestack on the GE Canada Davenport site without much controversy, I fear that old industrial smokestacks will also soon be demolished and forgotten even though they're interesting historical markers that can enliven an area with a greater sense of its own history.
    I wonder if there are any left on residential buildings?

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Parkdale area of T.O.
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    The only one I know of is the Toy Factory Lofts in Liberty Village. They took it down 7 years ago, restored it and put it back on the top of the building when they finished in 2008.
    Last edited by enelemcee; 2012-Jan-22 at 18:48.

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