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Thread: Brick and cobblestone streets in Toronto

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by junctionist View Post
    I'll take a look at Bremner by the ACC the next time I'm in the area and decide whether or to include it. Mariner Terrace is short and only includes the "driveway" area for the condos, so it's not enough as far as modern examples go for this list. The part of St. George with pavers is also too short in my opinion to be included. It's only the stretch in front of Sidney Smith Hall, and even there, it's just a series of poured concrete sections and pavers.
    Hence the honorary mention rather than full accreditation of stone-paved streets . Mariner Terrace has more than just the driveways, but it's definitely not fully paved.

    You will want to include Bremner by the ACC, though!
    www.Front65.com - Urban Ecology


  2. #62

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    If I recall correctly, the brick paved streets in Forest Hill (the one by UCC and the one sought of St. Clair, are private streets, not city streets, and the residents preferred brick and so paved them that way.

  4. #64

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    Actually, the primary brick streets we're thinking of are further west, btw/Spadina + Bathurst. (And IIRC there's also a few in Chaplin Estates.)

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    All of the brick streets in the Forest Hill area on that I have on the map appear to be public streets.

  6. #66

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    I suspect AP may be thinking of things like Clarendon Crescent (which are, indeed, "private")

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    Quote Originally Posted by SimonP View Post
    That's really great. I'd always heard that there was a brick paved street in the Beaches, but never knew exactly where.
    There definitely is in a residential street running north of Queen. I can't remember exactly where but I recall walking around it when I was looking for apartments in the area. I didn't think it was remarkable at the time not being from Toronto.. but I guess it is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nrb View Post
    There definitely is in a residential street running north of Queen. I can't remember exactly where but I recall walking around it when I was looking for apartments in the area. I didn't think it was remarkable at the time not being from Toronto.. but I guess it is.
    Pine Crescent

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    I found a rather unusual street that won't make the map, but is quite interesting and worth mentioning in this thread. Collier Street east of Park Road near Bloor and Church streets is a beautiful street lined with Victorian houses. It has strips of granite blocks amidst its asphalt roadway, perhaps as speed bumps. The strips are a tease at what a distinctly Toronto street would look like in modern times with granite block paving, if we restored it like in European cities on streets like The Esplanade, Yonge, or Front (which had stone block paving historically). But it also has unique sidewalks with concrete slabs arranged like stone, and a rare surviving instance of three rows of bricks on the roadway by the curbs. Modern road construction in the old city of Toronto incorporates only a single row of bricks by the curbs to ensure a consistent grade for drainage. Collier Street has a conventional asphalt surface west of Park Road, but the block between Park and Church also has concrete paver sidewalks.
    Last edited by junctionist; 2013-Feb-27 at 19:42.

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    Melbourne Place, running north between 10 and 12 Melbourne Avenue, is currently paved with brick.

    http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=10+Melb...V4iSqUJ8eMMz-w

    From the Toronto Public Library website:

    “Salmon's print inscribed on vso: MELBOURNE PLACE-NARROWEST STREET IN THE CITY MAY 1953.”


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    The residential streets on the Toronto Islands are narrower, but that's a great find. I'll add it to the map. Thanks wwwebster!

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    Like CDL.TO said. Pine CR in the beeches has the stone. Looks really cool too.

  13. #73

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    What about brick gutters next to the curb? Was that standard practice at some point? There are a few instances of that here and there.

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    Wellesley Cottages is a small, hidden brick street in Cabbagetown:

    https://maps.google.com/maps?q=2+wel...mZDg87v2meBMKg

    If laneways count, several new lanes in the revitalized Regent Park are paved with modern grey brick. This one runs parallel with Oak and Cole Streets:

    https://maps.google.com/?ll=43.66086...4,,0,3.19&z=19

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    Quote Originally Posted by andrew1980 View Post
    Wellesley Cottages is a small, hidden brick street in Cabbagetown:

    https://maps.google.com/maps?q=2+wel...mZDg87v2meBMKg

    If laneways count, several new lanes in the revitalized Regent Park are paved with modern grey brick. This one runs parallel with Oak and Cole Streets:

    https://maps.google.com/?ll=43.66086...4,,0,3.19&z=19
    Thanks, Andrew1980. Those are great examples that I'll be adding to the map. Wellesley Cottages looks like a very unique place in the city with those Victorian cottages on an obscure and intimate laneway, and it is enhanced by the modern brick pavers. The Regent Park laneway you show deserves attention as well. It's an example of permeable paving, which is supposed to be environmentally friendly by allowing water to be absorbed into the ground.

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